New Study Shows No Clear Benefits To Being Noticed By Senpai

 

An overwhelming 64% reported no improvement after being noticed by Senpai.

An overwhelming 64% reported no improvement after being noticed by Senpai.

STANFORD, CA – A new study by Stanford University showed that only 16% of those noticed by Senpai reported substantial improvements to their lives, with another 20% reporting some improvement. 64%, however, reported no improvement at all.

The study, conducted by Stanford’s department of social dynamics, showed no direct correlation between getting noticed by Senpai and a better situation in school or life in general.

“The yearning to be noticed by one’s Senpai is deeply rooted in our collective conscious,” said Dr. Laura Bratcliff, a senior researcher at the social dynamics department, “but it seems to be more about wishful thinking than empirical benefits.”

However, not everyone was convinced that the results of the study reflected reality. “I don’t care about some dumb study,” said Alice Klein, a 9th grade fujoshi from St. Louis. “Senpai will notice me and then everything will be better. I just know it!”

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Based in a one man space station in geosynchronous orbit over Japan, Neontaster is a graduate of Hard Knocks Gakuen with a masters degree in Moeology. He usually has no idea what the hell he is talking about, but is marginally competent at faking it. You can pelt him with rotten digital vegetables on twitter @neontaster